Hey Postcard Designers: Leave Room for Stamps! Sent to Austria, China, Germany, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, Taiwan, & the U.S.

We’ll get to the “room for stamps” bit shortly, but first: 17 postcard sends represented this time, so let’s get to it!

I clicked on “send a postcard” on Postcard United! This California map is bound for Longhua, Shenzhen, China. A second click sends another copy of the card to a map lover in Ipoh, Perak, Malaysia.

California Map Greetings from the Golden State w mermaid sea lion orca

Another click on Postcard United sends this card to a map lover in JiangSu, China.

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The Queen of Hearts is going to Foshan, Guangdong, China

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Ursula is off to Asahikawa, Hokkaido, Japan.

Pig Pen–the dirty candidate who is in fact innocent–is going out by request to Taichung City, Taiwan.

postcard toon Peanuts Vote Pig Pen

Another card going off by request: this view from Hilo, Hawaii’s Merrie Monarch Festival is destined for a Postcrosser in Yonago, Tottori, Japan.

Hilo Hawaii Hula

Whoa… Lucy & her balloon are off to a rare county for Postcrossing:  this is on its way to Melben, Austria.

postcard toon Peanuts strip Lucy balloon

Still more Peanuts: this one is going to Hong Kong.postcard toon Peanuts Snoopy

This octopus is attacking the San Diego Central Library. One thing to know if you are a postcard lover: the Friends of the Library store here is a great place to go postcard shopping! I sent this one out to a post pal in Hawaii.

San Diego Public Library ToshWerks

Another copy of the card is going out in a Postcrossing Forum library tag to a recipient in Ningbo, Zhejiang, China. Sadly, the design of the card’s back does not leave much room for anything larger than the smallest of domestic first-class stamps. No room for a larger stamp (like our round international stamps, among any number of others); no room for multiple stamps; no room for the postmark, which so often obscures a sizable chunk of real estate on the back of a postcard.  It would be nice, wouldn’t it, if the people designing the address side of cards were also people who send & receive postcards, themselves.

I recently popped into the Charles M. Schulz Museum, on the way home from somewhere else, just long enough to do a little postcard shopping! Poor Charlie Brown is going to a Postcrosser in Gunma, Japan.

Schulz Museum AAUGH

I also bought this new postcard, one copy of which is on its way to East Jakarta, Indonesia.

Schulz Museum My Favorite Peanuts

This image from The Princess & the Frog was requested by a frog-lover in Beckum, Germany.

Disney Princess and the Frog night lily

Another Art of Disney card–this one of Lion King’s Pride Rock–is going to Taichung, Taiwan.

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This beautiful sea otter is going to Foshan, Guangdong, China.

Postcard A Sea Otter California Coast

And finally, why are hard taco shells so popular? One bite, and the whole thing falls apart. Give me fresh corn tortillas! This box panel from “white people taco night” goes to Hangzhou, Zhejiang, China.

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Okay, are you ready for a huge party of stamps, stickers, & washi tape? Here you go! Any favorites this time?

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Disney625Disney626Disney625a

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The Jerk Who Ruined Postcrossing: Sent to China, Germany, India, & Taiwan

A Postcrossing batch, with some drama.

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The tiger is going to a tiger lover in Taipei, Taiwan.  She loves to travel (hey, me, too!), and says she has been to 28 countries so far (whoa!  I seem to have some catching up to do!).

Speaking of travel, the next card depicts the Hapuna Beach Prince, a resort on the Big Island of Hawaii’s Kohala coast.  I’ve not stayed here, though I have stayed at its older sister nearby.  This one is headed for Kunshan, Jiangsu  China, in a Postcrossing Forum tag trade, to a recipient who expressed an interest in receiving hotel postcards.

The California state map (uh, not to scale) is also going off to to China in a Postcrossing Forum trade: it goes to someone in Harbin, Heilongjiang, China who expressed an interest in map cards.  I notice I have several different California map cards, some more fun, others more informational.

Next comes one of California’s more beautiful sights, the Big Sur coastline.  That’s a regular Postcrossing draw, and it’s off to someone in Aachen, Germany who says he likes beautiful landscapes, including coasts.

Finally comes the black & white card at bottom, which went to Margao, Goa, India.  And herein lays a tale.  A dark moment in Postcrossing, one might say.

“Hi!  I love getting postcards as the whole world steps in my postbox! It’s such a beautiful experience. 🙂 “

Oh, what a nice start!  I agree with the sentiment.

Unfortunately, he keeps talking.

“On the card, write the name of your city and date of posting please. Also write about the card, as in what it depicts. I prefer information about the card, rather than your personal details.  To be frank, I don’t like the sender’s personal details on the card. Please do write the date and name of city/ town where posted.”

Okay, buddy, thank you for taking every bit of joy out of this Postcrossing experience.  Thank you for taking the personal connection out of the equation.  Thank you for transforming this from a fun pastime into a grim assignment.

I should have just picked whatever card I liked, and written a chatty little missive about myself, but I picked this black & white New York Stock Exchange photo, based on Jerky’s stated preferences of cards depicting “anything related to history, law or politics,” and then I looked up sources of information on the architect, George B. Price, and I shared that, with no frivolity such as a salutation or a signature.

If every Postcrosser were like this fella, I’d quit.

Sent to Belarus, China, and Japan

Three more going out via Postcrossing.

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My shot of Dale & Daisy posing in Lilu’okalani Gardens in Hilo, Hawaii, goes to Sendai, Japan, to a Postcrosser who says she loves Disney.  Funny, because the garden pictured here is said to be the biggest Edo-style garden outside of Japan.

Sendai is the origin of several foods, including gyūtan (cow tongue, usually grilled), hiyashi chūka (cold Chinese noodles), and robatayaki (Japanese-style barbecue). However, robatayaki was later introduced to Kushiro, which developed and popularized the dish. As a result, many people believe Kushiro is the origin of Robatayaki. Zundamochi (ずんだ餅, mochi balls with sweet, bright green edamame paste), and sasakamaboko (笹かまぼこ, kamaboko shaped like bamboo leaves) are also considered to be Sendai specialties. Sendai is also known for good sashimi, sushi, and sake. This is because Sendai is near several major fishing ports, such as Kesennuma, Ishinomaki, and Shiogama, and the fact that Miyagi Prefecture is a major producer of rice. There are many ramen restaurants in Sendai, and the area is known for a particular spicy miso ramen. Also, Sendai station offers the most types of ekiben of any station in Japan. In autumn, many people organize Imonikai, a sort of picnic by the river which involves making a potato stew called Imoni. –Wikipedia

The views of San Jose, California (which I have never seen so empty as in these images) goes to Minsk, Belarus, where the recipient asked for postcards that show buildings where we live.  I told him that right now, that park view has been transformed into San Jose’s annual Christmas in the Park, which is quite a thing to behold.

Minsk is in the area of mixed forests typical of most of Belarus. Pinewood and mixed forests border the edge of the city, especially in the north and east. Some of the forests were preserved as parks as the city grew.  The city was initially built on the hills, which allowed for defensive fortifications, and the western parts of the city are the most hilly. Minsk has a warm summer hemiboreal humid continental climate, owing to its location between the strong influence of the moist air of the Atlantic Ocean and the dry air of the Eurasian landmass. Its weather is unstable and tends to change often.  During 2003–2008 the overall weight of contaminants increased from 186,000 to 247,400 tons. The change of gas as industrial fuel to mazut for financial reasons has worsened the ecological situation. However, the majority of overall air pollution is produced by cars.  –Wikipedia

Jiangsu, China, is the destination of the remaining card.  The Postcrosser there is living in town as a student (she is actually from “…an island in the view of the sea from here is beautiful”), and she listed map cards as a thing she would like to receive.  I wrote about the places up & down the coast I like to visit & view the nature.

Jiangsu is home to many of the world’s leading exporters of electronic equipment, chemicals and textiles. It has also been China’s largest recipient of foreign direct investment since 2006. Its 2013 nominal GDP was almost 1 trillion US dollars, which is the 6th highest of all country subdivisions and more than half the size of India’s. — Wikipedia