Animal Edition: Received from Canada, Germany, Japan, Philippines, Russia, & the U.S.

Still lots of catching up to do around here! I have enough previously-unlogged cards with animals on them to make that the theme of this post. Here we go.

I’ve got a life-long love of maneki-neko! I actually have a small collection of them, though not all in my collection are small.  This came to me from Japan in a Postcrossing Forum tag, and you can read the message on the back (about maneki-neko) in the scan at the bottom of the post.

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This wonderful humpback whale card is from the Philippines, another Postcrossing Forum tag, and its scanned message is also shared down below.

This next card was NOT received via Postcrossing, Postcard United, swap-bot, or any of that; it’s a thank-you card for donating to Muttville senior dog rescue in San Francisco. Senior dogs are very special, and I donate to more than one organization that specializes in helping them. In fact, right now I am expecting a 2018 calendar I ordered from Old Friends Senior Dog Sanctuary in Tennessee.

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This beautiful seal came to me via Postcard United, from Kaluga, Russia. The sender tells me that it’s not far from Moscow, and:

We proud of Cosmonautics State Museum. I love art, music, puzzle, psychology, and to make photos.

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The Elasmosaurus, like the humpback whale we saw earlier,  came my way thanks to a Postcrossing Forum marine life & sea creature tag, this time from a sender in Texas, and she tells me:

Living in delightfully dry North Texas means I don’t get to see the ocean a lot. But I love reading about life millions and millions of years ago, when Texas was nothing but swamps and seas. Did you know they found plesiosaur bones when they started tearing up land to make DFW airport? Awesome!

Then we have this meerkat! As I type this, I think of the meerkats at the Santa Barbara Zoo, which I am POSITIVE get handouts from scofflaw zoo-goers. Every time I visit this beautiful zoo, and come around the corner toward the meerkat enclosure, these little guys become very attentive, especially if I have a bag from the gift shop. People who like to feed wild animals & zoo animals don’t give a damn about health concerns & dietary needs.

Anyhoo, this very tall card is from Biberach, Germany, via Postcard United.

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He seems to be keeping his eye on that hawk, and for good reason. The card is from Canada, received in a swap-bot “currently reading” trade, and the sender tells me:

I am reading H is for Hawk by Helen MacDonald. Please remember to rate me.

I would have rather heard about the book than had that prompt. I kinda hate swap-bot.

Time for stamps, etc.! I really like that pair of raptors from Canada, so well-paired with the card to which they are attached!
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I think I like this rooster from the Philippines even more! I’m also a big fan of the whale & fish stickers. And what a great shore bird sticker from Japan!

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“Despite What the News Have Said About Us…” Received from China, Greece, Malaysia, Netherlands, Russia, the Philippines, Singapore, and the U.S. **RANT INCLUDED!**

Let’s dive in!

Look at that cooool Totoro card!  Be sure to scroll down & see the stickers on the back, too.  A Postcrosser in Seattle, Washington sent this to me in a Postcrossing Forum tag trade.

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Right next to Totoro is a scene from Singapore’s very colorful Haji Lane.  I was able to request that card in another Postcrossing Forum tag–from the same person I’d received a similar card in this tag, a few months ago.

Then we go into the wild, sort of: Cameron Highlands, Malaysia.  The sender tells me:

“Greetings from Malaysia–a very warm country in South East Asia (avg. temperature: 30C).  Malaysia is a country with multiple cultures and religions.  Despite what the news have said about us, we still live in perfect harmony and celebrate all festival together.  I grew up in a small town call Cameron Highlands, a famous cool hill resorts which had average temperature of 16C throughout the year.  It is famous for its tea growing, vegetables farming and flower nurseries.  Now I live in the capital city–Kuala Lumpur.  But I still visit my parents back in Cameron Highlands during holidays.

Panda time: it comes from China, in another PF tag trade.

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Also from China is that colorful Shanghai skyline, sent to me by an Instagram friend who’d been noticing my postcard posts, and put out a call to his friends who would like to see postcards while he was traveling in China & Taiwan.

Oh, there’s a story behind that orca card.  And by behind it, I mean regarding the back side.

I flipped the tag over to find a taped-on block of orca info printed out from Wikipedia.  C’mon.  After that, the sender jammed in a handwritten hi-how-are-you-hope-you-enjoy-this-card-take-care, and a scrawled hieroglyph of an initial.  I know the card came from Seattle, Washington, because it was clear in the postmark (clear postmarks never being a guarantee), but I didn’t know the venue (Postcrossing Forum?  swap-bot?), or the user name.  I had to spend some time going through my inbox looking for possible senders of this card, then trying to match those possibilities with locations in their profiles.  UGH!

I wish everyone using these sites would take greater care and PLEASE neatly print the following:

  • The date (postmarks are not always clear–or present)
  • Trade venue (Postcrossing Forum?  swap-bot?)
  • Exact name of trade (many have similar names, and much trading is rapid)
  • User name (c’mon)

End rant, let’s go to Manila, Philippines. This card was received via Postcard United, and the sender tells me about “the Philippine jeepney–a unique mode of transportation here in my country.”  They sound like an adventure!

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Next, from Athens, Greece via a tag trade, comes the candy package, the contents of which are described by the sender as “ION Baloo, amazing butter candies.”  Onto the back of the card, she glued a panel from a box of tea I assume she also likes.  Scroll down & you’ll see it.

I got a colorful card & message from the Netherlands, in a regular Postcrossing incoming:

“I love the USA, I practically visit every year.  I’ve seen quite a lot of it…last visit was to San Francisco, what a beautiful city!  In daily life, I’m a nurse because I love to take care of people.  It was like a calling for me.”

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Another Postcrossing card: it’s the cannon, & it’s from a real estate agent in Moscow, Russia.  He printed out his message & glued it to the card–I’m assuming it has to do with English skills.  This reminds me of another card I received recently, which I guess I’ll include in a later post (if I don’t lose it).

Last up, from somewhere in Minnesota via swap-bot, is that cereal.  The sender tells me, “for ‘diet’ food, it’s actually pretty good.”

Okay, time to look at all of the stamps, stickers, & stuff.  The Totoro on the 1st image looks like a stamp, but is just part of the postcard printing.  My favorite 3 stamps down here, in order of scrolling appearance, are the spoonbill (U.S.), the chicken (Singapore), and the flowers (Malaysia.  How about for you?

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The Beautiful Postcard I Had to Toss Back in the Post–AND–No Red Ink, Please: Received from Japan, Philippines, Singapore, South Africa, Sri Lanka, and Taiwan

Yes, I’ve had a “catch and release situation.  We’ll get to that momentarily or so, but first:

LOOK AT THIS BEAUTIFUL POSTCARD!  And the beautiful one next to it!

The Tezuka Osamu crew, with Astro Boy in the center, came to me from Nara, Japan, in a Postcrossing Forum trade where senders show the cards they offer, and the recipients make a choice.  The sender wrote that her favorite here is Mitsume ga Tooru, the Three-Eyed One.

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The “Taiwan Snacks” card came to me thanks to another Postcrossing Forum tag, and is from a sender in Taipei.  She wrote:

“I want to share about Chinese snacks.  Steamed bun is a traditional food.  There are various flavours in steamed buns.  At breakfast time, I often eat steamed bun and drink a cup of coffee or soy milk.  Hope you can try it.”

Have a look at the coooool stamp from the Tezuka card!

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Okay, no more delay; it’s time to talk about the card I loved to see in my mailbox–but had to drop back into the system.

I was happy to see this nicely-illustrated map of Sri Lanka–I don’t think I’ve ever exchanged cards with Sri Lanka–but once I turned it over, I was confused.  The message was written in Chinese– and the address was not mine.

It’s long been a problem in this neighborhood: 1) at least a couple of the streets are numbered the same; and 2) a lot of the postal carriers are rather careless.  Apparently the carrier who spirited this into my mailbox saw a postcard & decided I was the postcard address (for it was delivered to me along with all the other cards in this post), nevermind the fact that the street written in the address field is 2 away from my own.  And so back into the system with it.

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I get to drown my sorrow, though, in merienda–Filipino snacks.  It’s a card I get to keep, and it came to me from Quezon City, Phillippines, and it came to me thanks to a swap-bot trade.  Usually around now, I would share at least part of the note written on the card, and this sender shared some interesting info about when merienda is “taken,” but there was a problem: the message was written in red ink on a brown background. Now, her writing is extremely neat, but the contrast issue…I had to pick up a magnifying glass.  I bought one a couple of months ago at a dollar store, so I could better enjoy the stamps coming in on my postcards, and it saved me with this postcard.  Red ink on a white card is difficult enough, but on brown?  And in the evening… the eye strain was great.  I also notice by lack of bar codes at the bottom of the card that it had to be hand-sorted.  I’m saying colored inks are nice for coloring, but for writing?  BLACK INK, PLEASE!  If you say this is never an issue for you, congratulations & consider yourself fortunate.  End of public service message.

Recycled packaging postcard time! “Ouma” came to me from Dalview, Gauteng, South Africa, in a swap-bot exchange of “upcycled cardboard.”  The sender tells me, “we are still in summer and I can’t wait for some cooler weather.” Where I live, we are still in winter, and I can’t wait for some warmer weather!

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That Fullo looks pretty good.  It was sent to me from Singapore, thanks to a Postcrossing Forum food package postcard tag.

Time for all of the backsides.  You will see a bit of the red ink on brown, but please know that my scan not only enlarged the card; it also darkened the ink considerably.  I love these fruit & flower stamps from the Philippines & Taiwan!  All the stamps are nice, actually.

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So Much Awesomeness, All at Once! Received from China, Netherlands, Philippines, & the U.S.

Six postcards, all of which I love, from four senders, all in one day!  What a day!

These two Shiba Inu come from China, via Postcrossing Forum, in a tag in which we were able to choose the cards we’d like from those the sender had available.  With my memory, it’s always still a surprise!

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The cards’ sender tells me:

“I love Shiba too!  I found lots of them during my trip to Japan last year.”

This type of dog is very popular around my neighborhood; I see them being walked quite often. They are beautiful, but being a lover of big dogs, the inu I would most like to adopt would be the Akita!

That very nice Christmas tree closeup comes to me thanks to Postcard United, and is from a member in Tolbert, Groningen, Netherlands.

Look at that awesome Japanese Christmas postcard featuring Snoopy & friends!  It’s from Cindi in Hawaii, who really gave the card a spectacular back (scroll down).  Why doesn’t the U.S.–home of Snoopy–have Peanuts postcards, for Christmas, or for whatever?  I’ve railed about this more than once before, and will continue to do so. As the Peanuts kids would say, SIGH.

Okay, another pair from a single sender, this one from the Philippines, via Postcard United.

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Yum.

Yum. Now I want both of these dishes.  I’ve cooked adobo more than once, but you know, practice makes perfect.  Have you made (or eaten) either of these?  The sender split her message over the two cards.  She wrote:

“Kamusta Ka?  (How are you?) Like you, I enjoy Asian food–which is fortunate for me coz I’m living in Southeast Asia.  I do enjoy trying new dishes every now & then.  Currently I’m crazy over Korean grilled meat, & salmon sashimi!”

The beautiful animal stamps on the back of these are wonderful, too–there’s a pangolin!  Well, just scroll down now & look at all the stamps, stickers, washi tape & stuff.

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Sooo much awesomeness.  This is a card I could display with either direction facing out.

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Seals Wet, Canada Dry: Sent to The Philippines and Taiwan

Sending some cards out for my new favorite part of Postcrossing, the Forum!

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The first card goes to Manila, Philippines, for a manga/anime tag. This Postcrosser is like me, in that she is wishing for a message on the back of the cards she gets.  She does offer an extensive list of favorites, but, she says:

“…any postcard is welcome. All I would like is to connect with you!  If you don’t know what to write in your postcard, you can tell me a little quirk about yourself…or what your postcard is about, or something about your country! Your favorite quote..a memory that makes you laugh. Or you can write a phrase or a sentence in your language and translate it, that would be really cool! Are you a cat person or a dog person? Anything random that comes in your mind will do!”

The next two cards are going to Kaohsiung City, Taiwan, to different Postcrossing members.  I was not enough of an idiot to ask whether they know one another; after all, Kaohsiung City has a population of about 2.77 million people!

I wonder whether these two know one another.

The harbor seals are part of a sea life/marine animals tag, and the bit of box is for a food packaging exchange.  This last Postcrosser, I learned, has had it up to here with scenic postcards: “PLEASE… NO more city views or landscape cards.”

Well!