The Benefit of an Attempted Ban: Just purchased

I just received a new order of postcards yesterday. I ordered a bunch of these cards–which I otherwise wouldn’t have known about or sought out–thanks to a story I read about an attempt to prevent the image from being circulated.

Trump Cult Nick Anderson

Thanks to CBLDF and our coalition partners, the online marketplace Redbubble has reinstated a cartoon by Pulitzer Prize–winning editorial cartoonist Nick Anderson that was previously removed because of a meritless complaint by the Trump re-election campaign. CBLDF applauds Redbubble for reinstating the cartoon, and urges them to reject any other attempts by political campaigns to suppress protected speech.

And so, an attempt to restrict protected speech, to hide humorous commentary, has in fact resulted in greater exposure for the work, and more profit for the creator.

I also come across (and purchase) a lot of great books in similar circumstances. Do you ever read banned books?

“Lots” of Old Postcards (Strolling Character Edition)

A few posts back, I shared several old Disney cards I’d snapped up for my Postcrossing stash via online auctions. There were a lot more where that came from, so here is part 2! This time, the focus is (at least mostly) on the costumed characters wandering the parks. You can tell these shots span some number of years, based on the work Mickey is continually having done!

Do you have any favorites here? I think that Dumbo at the bottom is interesting, and of course I always like Baloo, but I think in this batch, my fave is astronaut Mickey & Goofy standing in front of Space Mountain!

Food & Travel Edition: Received from China, Hong Kong, Indonesia, Singapore, & Taiwan

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15 cards to share this time! Food & travel–but really mostly food you might encounter while you travel! I love this. These cards date back as far as 2017–still decluttering–and mostly came my way through Postcrossing Forum, but also from regular Postcrossing and Postcard United (do you use that service, too?).

The xiao long bao basket came, as you can see, from Taiwan. The sender wrote:

“Mini steamed dumplings (Xiao Long Bao) is one of the most famous food in Taiwan.
DIN TAI FUNG is the most famous chain stores and I think it has also some stores
in California! Have you ever tried it before?”

Yes. I have tried the Din Tai Fung XLB in San Jose, California; Bangkok, Thailand; and Taipei, Taiwan. I also stopped by the DTF in Los Angeles–but only to buy a mug with their cool dumpling folks on it!

There’s more xlb on these cards, so let’s serve it up now:

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The card came from China, and the sender will have us know that this one is “…not xiao long bao. It calls guan tang bao. It’s a famous snack in Jiang province. Although I don’t know the difference between them yet. Lol.”

The card next to that is also from China, and I’m told the food is Xiazhi noodle, a dish traditionally eaten to celebrate the coming of summer, because “it can bring you cool feelings!”

Back to Taiwan for two cards showing a whole lot of food (including one last look at soup dumps for this time around:

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I really like this night market snack card. My trip to Taiwan was quite recent, and I can tell you: the night markets were not crowded. Now, this is nice in that I really don’t enjoy crowds (I’ve been in crowded, touristy night markets, where I’ve had to put my arms down at my sides and just scootch along, tightly in the slow wave of humanity); but it was very much not nice, because most of the food was not freshly-prepared, as it would have to be were there a constant line.

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A lovely produce market painting, also from Taiwan…

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…and a delicious map of China. The sender writes, “do you know where in China you can eat food from all over the country? You can find food from every corner of China in universities. Because students may go far away to attend a university, so the restaurants should meet everyone’s taste on the campus.”

That’s funny; I think all of the colleges here in the U.S. have Pizza Hut.

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And from Indonesia, a delicious, simple, Indonesian recipe! Indonesian restaurants are a rare find where I live. Now, here are a couple of great food photos from China:

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Also from China, what seems to be a visual lesson in how to make jianbing:

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The Hong Kong egg tart postcard came from Hong Kong.

Two cards to go! The card on the left is fron Singapore, and the sender wrote nothing at all about all of this food, choosing to tell me all about her 3 recent, expensive, trips to the dentist.

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The card on the right is from Hong Kong, printed from a photo taken by the sender, who writes “noodle soup is a Asian staple food.”

…and, here are all of the stamps. Lots of nice ones, and one of my favorites is on the very bottom row, right in the middle. It’s a “Kitchenware Street” card from HK, and it was on the back of the card I ended with. Do you have any favorite cards or stamps this time?

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Infinite Crisis: Received from Japan, Russia, South Korea, Taiwan, & the U.S.

This time:

  • How do you slap a new backing on a received card (catch & release)?
  • Postcrossers not living in the country Postcrossing think they live in
  • An “inner-national” piece of mail via Postcard United
  • Not covered at all down below, but I recieved two pieces of mail (one a week for the past two weeks) for that house that is not on my street
  • And other stuff

Let’s do this.

Hey, look at this travel poster-themed card from Cindi in Hawaii!  She tells me the art is by Nick Kuchar, who I see has been doing some good work over there for a little while now.

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Some more beautiful art now, this one an original piece made for me by a swap-botter in Pennsylvania for a “Earth Day Upcycle Postcard Swap.”  She really got into the theme!  She tells me:

“I’ve always loved this holiday.  I was president of my school’s ecology club, and now I spend a lot of time hiking and camping in nature.  I want future generations to enjoy the same beautiful places as well.”

The line about hiking in nature reminds me of my Facebook friend who always posts a status of “taking a walk” when he is at a mall.

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Next up is Hello Kitty, who of course–as you know, if you follow the news–is not a cat.  That’s from Japan via Postcrossing Forum, and I’m not going to transcribe the message, because it’s part of the scan down at the bottom of this post.  Some fun sticker work there, too!

The big red star is a regular Postcrossing card, sent to me from Moscow, Russia by someone living there for the last 5 years. She says she was born in Belarus.  Her member registration is BY–meaning she still tells Postcrossing that she lives in Belarus, and thus officially, I received this card from Belarus.  But I didn’t.

I love that not-snowman beach scene, from a Postcard United member in Jeju Island, South Korea! She tells me the writing on the card translates to “I hope your dreams come true.  Keep it up.”

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The Mount Hood card was sent to me from the Medford, Oregon area for a swap-bot “recycled postcard” swap, in which we were to slap a new backing on a card we’d received & send it to our swap partner.  Now, when I do this, I grab a chunk of cardboard (usually from a stamp order), glue it to the back, & cut it to size. Very chunky, heavy, & inelegant.  This sender had some sort of thin white sticker printed with “POSTCARD” across the top, “Please deliver to” on the address side, and “This card handstamped by _________” on the bottom of the message side.  I can see through the sticker that there is writing underneath–but I can’t see it all that well.  I guess I should scan this side of the card so you can see exactly what I’m talking about, but it’s early in the morning as I write this portion of this entry, I’m curled up on the end of the couch with my 1st cup of coffee, and I’m feeling too lazy.  This takes up too much of my time, anyhow!  In my thank-you message to the sender, I suggested I’d like to know about the special (lightweight) backing–but now word back as of yet.  Do you think she designed it herself to print on some Avery sticker paper?

Pooh is from Taiwan, via a Postcrossing Forum tag trade.  Scroll down to enjoy a whole lot of wonderful stamps!

The two recipe cards here arrived blank, in an envelope, along with a signature written in an odd Easter card (no message, just “Happy Easter!,” a signature, & Postcard United ID).  It was sent to me from Chicago, Illinois.  What?  I thought we were only supposed to receive cards from other countries!  Consarn it.  Well, I know there are people who would like to receive these cards.  In fact, I’ve already mailed one out–but those details can wait for a future post.

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Time for stamps, stickers, washi tape, & stuff.

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I love this huge-man-in-a-little-airplane stamp from South Korea!

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A Successful Hunt: Postcard Shopping Along the Interstate

Okay, neither of the roads I’m talking about–officially California State Route 1 and U.S. Route 101–are part of the Interstate system, but let’s not facts get in the way of a decent title.

I written a few times here about my complete failure to find any California map cards to replenish my depleted stock.  I see in people’s profiles & tag requests that map cards are often what they want, but recent trips to areas such as Monterey and the state’s northern coast have netted me absolutely nothing.  Well, a whirlwind day trip to San Luis Obispo County after a short morning work shift earlier this week put me in the pink again, state card-wise!

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I think I ended up with over 80 cards, buying multiples of these and a couple of others that bear photos.  I bought them at three places where I usually buy postcards in the area: a tiny “super” market, a Rite Aid, and–the primary source, as always–a gas station!

The best news, considering the quantity I’ve purchased, is the price: I bought more than 60 at the gas station, and those were 35 cents each.  Expensive!  I mean, at the Rite Aid, where I bought fewer than 30 (I think), they were only 25 cents!

So what I’m saying is, I’m stocked up on state map cards again.

 

 

Lost in Translation: Received from China

I was listening to my NPR One app today, caught a piece entitled Finding A Pedicure In China, Using Cutting-Edge Translation Apps–and I remembered that I have a story to share.

Not so long ago, this postcard from China dropped through my mail slot, thanks to Postcard United.

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Oh, how nice.  It was when I turned it over that I did a triple-take.

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Well, this is a first!  The official language of Postcard United (and Postcrossing) is English (how very convenient for us native English-speakers).  While I’ve received many cards with a word or several in the sender’s native tongue, I’d never received a card with NO English (“Happy Postcard United” doesn’t count)!

Off I went in search of an app that might do a visual translation for me.  That found, I took a shot of the card’s message, & sent it through:

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Did you catch that?  Let’s review:

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I… don’t think that was a good translation.  And you ought to have heard the app speak it out!

I decided to post the pic of the card on Facebook, since I know a lot of Chinese-speakers.  One Taiwan-born friend reported back:

This is my rough translation from the poem:

I am like a bird in a forest, struggling to free myself towards the sky, boldly spread my shoulders and close my eyes, distant horizon is only short steps away, I am just like that tiny bird in a forest, without existence and aiming for the moon, my wings are stained in blood and any setback will not stop me from flying higher.

Oh, a poem!

I thanked my friend, who said “I am glad my grade 8 Chinese came in handy.”

Have you had any experiences along these lines?

The Card that Stalked Me

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We kept meeting.

Tinne asked me, “How did the story end with the postcard that kept returning to your mailbox, even though it was not for you?”

This is a good question!  I’d dropped the topic of the postcard that was delivered to me 5 times in just over a 2-week period, even once being removed from my mail slot’s “outgoing” clip, & stuck right through again!

Here’s what’s new since then: I finally took the card into my local post office, and talked to the clerk.  She rolled her eyes, made some comment about how ridiculous the situation was, and said she’d speak to the route supervisor.

And I haven’t seen the card since.

Of course, I have no idea if the card ever reached its true addressee!

 

#wemisdeliverforyou  #failmail

Is My Postman Trolling Me?!?

This is no postcard; it’s a BOOMERANG.

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This postcard is not addressed to me, but my mailman seems to think I should keep it.  I’m really frustrated, after what happened today.  Let’s update the timeline:

February 28: I received a card meant for the same house number, 2 streets over

March 2: I dropped it into a post office mailbox

March 4: The card found me a 2nd time

March 5: I dropped it into a mail box in front of another post office

March 8: I’ve received the same card, for the 3rd time!

March 9: I dropped the card into a mailbox in a different county.

March 15: The card was delivered to me, for the 4th time.

March 16: I attached the card to the outside of my home mail slot

March 16: I came home to find the postman had STUCK IT RIGHT BACK IN.  5th delivery.

This last bit doesn’t even make sense.  Does the postman not know what street he’s on?  How does ANY of my mail make it to me?  How does any of these other people’s mail find them?  I mean, assuming it does…

I’m going to try to find time tomorrow to take this to the local post office & have a conversation with the clerk.