This is a LuLu of a Post: Sent to Canada & the U.S.

It’s time for another “chunk of cardboard” trade on swap-bot!  This month’s star: Little Lulu (and Tubby).

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These chunks were saved from a toy package, and cut to postcard dimensions.  They’re all stamped up, written out, and mailed off to (from left to right):

Atlantic Beach, Florida

St. Paul, Minnesota

Sherwood Park, Alberta, Canada

Stamps, stickers, and washi tape:

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Wet & Dry (but not in that order): Received from Russia & the United States

It’s another chunk of cardboard!

I love these swap-bot trades, where any cardboard can be turned into a postcard.  This big chunk from Saint Paul, Minnesota–I don’t know what it’s fashioned from, exactly–it’s apparently the box for a towel made of non-woven fabric.

The sender writes:

“What are you reading lately?  I am working my way thru John D. McDonald’s Travis McGee series, and also John Sandford.  Yesterday I started Guns, Germs and Steel.  It’s long, and I’m hoping it’s not too dry.”

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The ocean postcard comes from a Postcrosser in Moscow, Russia, who writes:

“Greetings from Russia with the wishes of good luck, joy, happiness.  I like to travel the world, taking pictures of sights.  I like painting, especially the marine pictures.  The postcard–Black Sea–Russian painter Ivan Aivazovsky, picture.  Your photos are super!!!  You’re professional!!!

“‘We all have time to expend on what is essential to our nature.’ –Thornton Wilder”

Stamps & postmarks:

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Double Chunk: Received from the U.S.

 

A trio in via swap-bot:

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“Aged Vanilla” — that’s my rap name.

The big card with the people on it is from Fort Myers, Florida, and the sender refers to the person responsible for this colorized, captioned image: “I am a big fan of Nick Bantock and his offbeat sense of humor… I’m also a fan of the Naughty Little People series, for the photographer’s irreverent and humorous take on sometimes risque situations.  I like things that surprise me while also making me laugh or causing a wry smile.”

The other two are chunk-of-cardboard trades.  By the way, you should see the stack of rescued-from-the-recycling “chunks” I have right now, ready to cut into postcard-size.  Heck, I guess you WILL see them at some point–if you stay tuned.

That panel from a package of tempting-looking chocolate comes from somewhere around Savannah, Georgia.  This swapper asks me, “have you ever listened to ‘La Mer’ by Nine Inch Nails?  It is a beautiful instrumental piece of music!”  I love the puffy fish stickers on the back of her card.

The cream soda card–and take a hard look at the scan & see the embossing–came from a swapper in Saint Paul, Minnesota, who says, “for 2016 I would like to do some decluttering around the house.”

Stamps, stamps, stickers, washi tape & embossery:

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As a sea life fan, I love those puffy fish stickers.  As an elephant lover, I hate that stamp & the circus it represents.

Horrible Cereal, but Cool Postcards! Sent to the United States

Some time ago, I was given the swell gift of a box of this cereal.  It was snail-mailed to me!  The swell part was not the cereal itself, which I ended up dumping after I tasted it, but the fact that it made for such fun postcards!

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Yes, it’s another swap-bot chunk-of-cardboard swap, in which participants were to create postcards out of their recyclables.  This lovely round is headed for swappers in Saint Paul, Minnesota; Chandler, Arizona; and Atlantic Beach, Florida.

Stamps, stamps & tape for this round:

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Leaving an Impression, & Also Jane Gluster: Received from Germany, Hong Kong, & the United States

Three interesting ones today, so sayeth the me:

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I was immediately impressed with that chunk of cardboard that came to me from Saint Paul, Minnesota, via swap-bot.  The cereal that was once inside the box probably had fiber, but this card has texture!  The sender writes:

“I’m having fun with my embossing machine.  I like the dangling ornaments.  It’s cheery.”

I like it too!  You’ll probably be able to make out the design better in the second of the two images I’ve posted.

I also really like that Hong Kong postcard.  I’d identified the city from the street signs, before I even noticed it says “Hong Kong” right there on the upper-left corner.  Wish I were there right now.  Well, unless it’s cold.  I don’t want to me anywhere cold, including where I am right now.  This card, and the cool stickers on the back, came to me thanks to a Postcrossing Forum “Hong Kong to the World” tag trade, in which I am “the World” half of the deal.

That super-colorful Nutcracker card was sent to me by a Postcrosser in Regensburg, Germany. She writes to me about books she enjoys reading.  I thought she was telling me about someone named “Jane Gluster,” but after getting in a rather heated argument with Google, I decided what she wrote must have actually been Jane AUSTEN.  Oh, believe me, you would have made the same mistake; some of her writing is very curly!  Let’s try to get through the whole “book” part of her message:

“I’m love reading too.  My favorite genres are historical or mysterious novels, and I’m a great fan of Jane Austen! I’m waiting for the new book from Libba Bray, in Germany it will appear shortly before Christmas.”

Stamps, stickers–and also perhaps a better look at the embossing:

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Hey, that postcard has a HUGE Chip on it!

The U.S.’s High Five?!?? Sent to Taiwan & the United States

Kitty is hanging out in the recycling.

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Kitty is going to a cat lover in Taichung City, Taiwan, for a Postcrossing Forum USA-Asia tag trade.

The rest of the cards are hewn from cardboard boxes, for a couple of swap-bot trades calling for recycled bits.  Two panels from boxes of chocolate-covered cookies from It’s-It (mmmm): one is on its way to Saint Paul, Minnesota; the other is headed to Livonia, Michigan.  The latter person had the oddest statement in her profile: she said she lives in “the U.S.’s high five.”  Now, what on earth does that mean?  Yes, I Asked Jeeves, and even Google, but there was no help to be found.  I was in a library earlier today, but it had passed my mind until I sat back down here to tell you about it.  Do you have any idea what she was talking about?

The cake pic came from a box of cake flour, and now that card will go to lovely San Diego, California.  I’m a bit cold today in the San Francisco Bay Area, so I’d like to try San Diego on. Just for a while, though–until I am able to move someplace warm.

Lastly, there is the happy little face, formerly a side panel from a box of tissues.  Someone in Belle Mead, New Jersey should be winding up with that.

Now I am looking forward to seeing what cardboard scraps people cut into postcards to send to me!  Do you ever create such postcards?

Pop-Tarts–and other inedible objects: Received from Northern Ireland, Russia, Slovenia, and the United States

Pop-Tarts: YUCK.  So dry, so hard, so unsatisfying.  Is this what hardtack was like?  This swap-bot chunk of cardboard (no more cardboard, really, than the product inside) from a grown woman  in Saint Paul, Minnesota who admits, “Pop-Tarts are never as good as I think they’ll be.  But I’m a sucker for pumpkin fall treats.”

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The rest of the cards came my way via Postcrossing.

The Giant’s Causeway–whoa!  It’s in Northern Ireland, and the sender from Derry tells me, “it’s one of our most famous landmarks/attractions.”  I looked it up, and learned from Wikipedia that this “…is an area of about 40,000 interlocking basalt columns, the result of an ancient volcanic eruption.”  It’s so amazing, because as I viewed more photos, these seemed to me to be individual cement pourings assembled together.  I read further, and was satisfied by the legend that these were indeed made by man, or more precisely, by the giant Finn MacCool.

The drawing of the pair hugging came to me from Tyumen, Russia. This Postcrosser tells people in her profile that she is “waiting for cards with date and warm words.”  No date on the card she sent me, but here are the warm words: “I wish you good day.”  In her defense, the back of the card was already, for some reason, printed with 8 lines of text, with wide spaces between lines.  Created for people who don’t know what to write?

The Jungle Book card, a fun surprise, is from Slovenia.  Also not much writing on the back, also not much room left for writing, thanks to additional Mowgli & Baloo art.  Sure, I would have been able to squeeze in a decent-sized message on each of these two cards, but I am special!  Just like everyone else.

Stamps, stickers, postmarks & stuff:

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Love that pig.

A Lingering Odor Amidst the Recycling: Sent to Canada, South Africa, and the United States

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You just know those folks in the lab coats did something horrible in their previous lives to deserve this job.

All swap-bot in this batch, and 3 of the 4 for the “chunk of cardboard” trade.  The fourth is for a swap called “butt-ugly postcard,” and I pulled it from and old book from Klutz Press called “The World’s Tackiest Postcards.”  So glad there have been a couple of swaps worthy of these horrible tacky cards–otherwise, I would have had to mail them to my friends!

Recycling & whatnot: Sent to England & the United States

Four cards sent out today, in two swap-bot trades:

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The dragon card was originally sent to me with some other cards in an envelope for another swap-bot trade.  Now it is going out to Auburn, California in a “free postcard” trade.  Since it has been years since I have stumbled into any of those racks of free ad postcards, I am grateful to have anything at all to send out in a trade such as this.

The remaining cards are going out in one of my favorite ongoing swap-bot trades, the “chunk o cardboard.”  As the name implies, all that is required is that one mail out a chunk of cardboard…

…for the swap’s host in Saint Paul, Minnesota, though, I try to send something special.  I created sea life postcards in sextuplicate a couple of months or so ago; I think this may be the third of the batch I am mailing out.  The others I have sent are posted on this blog, too.  I’m always happy for a chance to be paired with this member, & thank her for creating a cool swap.

The ginger ale is going to another swapper with whom I’ve been paired more than once in the past; she’s in Immingham, England, and though I am sure she’s encountered ginger ale, I have no idea if it would have been Canada Dry.  All of a sudden, I have a great thirst for Schweppes.

And its famous Schweppervescence.

Back to the U.S., the dog treat panel is on its way to a swapper in Goleta, California. I tell her I wasn’t sure if my dog would go for this new product, as she doesn’t usually like snacks with what I’d call a “plastic-y” texture.  Well, I needn’t have worried.

Face it, Tiger: You’re Surrounded by Mail Art! Sent to Finland and the United States

It’s a swap-botty kind of day…

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The three collaged cards are part of a “chunk ‘o’ cardboard” exchange, in which we need to do no more than mail out a simple scrap of cardboard cut to postcard proportions.  Sometimes I use these for my silly version of mail art, which may not be to others’ standards, either in artistic perspective or skill.

The top left card started life as a Kleenex box, onto which I slapped a bit of coffee label, and then characters from the packaging of pharmaceuticals, Kinder toys, and taro chips.  This lovely, layered piece of art goes to the swap’s host in Saint Paul, Minnesota.

The set of two are cardboard scraps covered with a nighttime scene from a coffee canister, and then populated with Richard Scarry characters rescued from a worn-out, discarded library book.  They go to two cities in New York: New York City, and Liverpool.

The tiger is headed for Kokkola, Finland, part of a “Zazzle” swap in which we are to mail out cards we have had professionally printed (by whatever company) from our own images.  This, surely, will be one of the best cards ever sent out in that trade!