Update on a **#%^ Cipher, and, Sent to Belarus, China, Netherlands, and Taiwan

Let’s start with an UPDATE!  You know that one post from last week?  Yes, that’s the one: the one about that cipher Postcrosser in Germany who provided zero profile, zero favorites, zero way of getting to know her or to know what to send or say to her.  Well, she got the card I sent her!  I reprint the entire message she sent me between the two lines below:



Yes, you read that correctly: she wrote absolutely nothing in the “Hooray message” that would normally contain a little thank you.  So we have here someone who put zero effort into Postcrossing, sucking all fun & enrichment out of the (non-)encounter, for this user at least.

Hey, I just thought of what I should have done as far as a message on her card, rather than the minimalist note I described in my original post!  If I had it to do over again, I would have printed out my own profile, & pasted that to my card, so she could have an example of a user profile!

This does not end poorly, actually. I got a second automated e-mail from Postcrossing about the card I sent to Cipher: a user in France added it to her wall of favorites!

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Okay, now for the current slew of postcards, counter-clockwise from the top left.

The elephant seal is bound for Gomel, Belarus, where the Postcrosser professed a love of nature.  If you ever find yourself on California’s Highway One just south of Big Sur, you have got to stop at Piedras Blancas and see the hordes of elephant seals, the crowd a bit different at every time of the year.  Until you can make that journey, you can peek in at them via webcam!

The alphabet will end up, I hope, in Den Helder, Netherlands, with a Postcrosser who said she enjoys alphabet & letter cards.  Happy to find a good home for this, one of the few cards I have left from the big box ‘o book cover postcards which was all had to rely on when I first started Postcrossing a bit over a year ago.

That wonderful tiger (who, as it happens, was photographed not far from San Simeon) is on its way to Shandong, China, to someone who says he likes to collect stamps.  The card has four different stamps, all very nice, I think.

Finally, there is the recycling.  The box labeled It’s-It goes to Taoyan, Taiwan, in a Postcrossing Forum food package postcard tag.  The It’s-It factory is quite close to San Francisco International airport in the city of Burlingame.  No tours, but there is a factory store, where they sell some varieties of the ice cream sandwich I’ve never seen in stores–and also mugs & t-shirts, of course.  On my first visit, I bought a mug–and also a cooler fulla sammiches. You see this postcard is hacked not from a sandwich package, but from the box for a special product made of two components from the sandwich: the crispy oatmeal cookie, and the chocolate dip.  Wonderful stuff.

Received from China, Germany, New Zealand, & the United States

Mail call: cards in through Postcrossing & swap-bot.

postcard112aThe train buzzing past the beach came to me from Tauranga, New Zealand (a trip of 6,521 miles/25 days), where the sender told me that image is of “the only passenger train that runs the length of NZ. It’s a long slow trip!”

The tasty food illustration came to me from Shandong, China (6,104 miles/40 days). The sender doesn’t tell me what these bowls may contain, only that she was writing to me from her college library.

Stuttgart, Germany is the source of the abstract image (another long trip: 5,764 miles/32 days), and the sender expresses envy of my warmer climate: I’m not far from beaches; she’s got snow.  I told her my climate is far from tropical–but I would not switch places with her!

That big cereal box panel comes to me from O’Fallon, Illinois, yet another “Chunk-O-Cardboard” received through swap-bot.  The sender closes with the question, “the man who discovered milk, what was he doing?”  I asked her what made her so sure it was a man.

Stamps!

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Sent to Qingdao, Shandong, China

I couldn’t believe how hard it was to find some touristy postcards in my area.  It seems I ALWAYS see them, wherever I go, but once I signed up for Postcrossing & swap-bot, the ubiquitous racks disappeared!  I finally found this in a Hallmark Store.  A few of the local big cities were also represented–but not very well.  I’ll have to keep my eyes open as I go about my regular business, or more likely, spend some more time in touristy places.

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My favorite place here is the coastline, followed by the redwoods. How about you?