SCUBA Chuck: Sent to Belgium, Canada, China, Finland, Germany, Hong Kong, Japan, Netherlands, Russia, Sweden, & Taiwan

TWENTY outgoing cards in this post! This all happened over the course of a few weeks.

Several more Postcrossing Forum tags heading out. Charlie Brown & Woodstock are heading for Shanghai, China. If you poke around the Santa Rosa area, you will find many Peanuts statues, decorated by local artists in many different styles. My favorite of the few I’ve spotted stands outside a seafood restaurant in a coastal area: it’s Charlie Brown in SCUBA gear.
Postcard422

The food package is going to Guangzhou, Guangdong, China. I don’t remember much about the cookies, but it says “crisp and buttery,” so therefore I know I loved them.

From Guangzhou, Guangdong, we go to Guiyang, GuiZhou, China— that’s where this big “Let’s Go with Lucy” card is headed. A card as large as this leaves a large canvas for stickers & washi tape, as well as plenty of room for a message. I’ve obscured the message, but you can see the stamps, stickers, & washi tape below.

postcard toon Peanuts Vote Lucy

Lucy pounding sand went off to Hirai, Wakayama, Japan; and Linus the door-to-door salesman to Tsushima, Aichi, Japan.

Postcard444

I chose Charlie Brown for a recipient in Tokyo, Japan. The evil queen went to Shanghai, China, and the beautiful sea otter was destined for Eutin, Germany.

Postcard443

“California is So Cool.” When I made a Disneyland trip not so long back, I tried to find postcards in the park, but failed. This I bought at a convenience store across the street, and now it goes out to Koriyama, Fukushima, Japan in a Disney cards tag.

Postcard 421“California Has Everything.” Now we are clearly bragging. This one is heading for Ashikaga, Tochigi, Japan, in a “what I’m reading now” tag. I’m reading The Underground Railroad, by Colson Whitehead.

Completing the California trilogy is the California Coast Highway 1 postcard, careening off to Hong Kong.

Another California card? Yes, this view of Point Lobos goes via a rare Postcrossing draw, to a recipient in Gnesta, Sweden, who expressed a preference for cards showing places–and Point Lobos is a great place!

postcard a Point Lobos

A second Postcrossing draw; this one goes to Dirgenheim, Germany. Sad to say, this lovely series of national park postcards neglects to mention the state where each park is located. This despite a long passage of text on the back so expansive that it leaves room for only a single stamp! The designer really does not understand the postally-obsessed. Not to mention that the postmark will more that likely obscure all of that printed prose.

Postcard449

Another one of the national park cards: okay, this one does mention on the back that Acadia National Park is on the Maine coast. This one is a regular Postcrossing draw, and goes to Lahti, Finland. The recipient requested that people not use stickers or washi tape on her cards, so I won’t bother to flip this one over for you.

Postcard450

Scuttle and his dinglehopper are going to Kuwana, Mie, Japan, in a Disney cards tag. Ursula is on the back of the card (proof below).

Now several more regular Postcrossing draws: not something I do so often any more, but I am just in the mood to send out more cards (and by extension, receive more). The California Natural Wonders card was actually in the “favorites” of the person to receive it; she lives in Zoetermer, Netherlands.

Postcard453

The lemurs are going to a paleontologist in Omsk, Russia. She wanted illustrations of animals, so here she goes!

The map card goes to a map card lover in Taipei, Taiwan; and the bridge card goes to Dendermonde, Belgium, to a lover of touristy cards.

Postcard454

Lucy and Schroeder are going to a Peanuts lover in Espanola, Ontario, Canada. Unlike the recipient in Finland, this person loves a decorated card, so I did my best on the backside.

Time for stamps, stickers, & stuff. I love these brand-new Bioluminescent Life stamps from the USPS!

Postcard423Postcard424

Postcard445Postcard446Postcard448

Postcard451

Postcard452

Postcard455

Advertisements

Stuffables & Stuff: Received from Japan

** First, a note on the giveaway: NO ONE WANTS IT so far!  All is exactly as I had suspected–but please check it out, & let me know if you would like to stake a claim.**  

Now, look at this beautiful surprise envelope I got from a Postcrosser in Utsunomiya, Tochigi, Japan:

postcard583a

This Postcrosser, who has been on the site for just over a year & writes in her profile that she has never been overseas, really threw herself into sending something special across the ocean to a person she was assigned through a rather random website click.  Look at that beautiful envelope she fashioned out of a map!  Look at the wonderful things that were inside!

She writes:

“…Utsunomiya there are a lot of specialty shops of pan-fried dumpling.  At first, dumpling was imported from China, pan-fried dumpling is one of popular food in Japan.  Do you know the pan-fried dumpling?  I like delicious it.”

Yes, I know them & like them, too–although with all of the dumplings out there, I do not get to these all that often.  There’s the Chinese name, kuo teh, AKA pot stickers, and there’s the Japanese name, gyoza.  And here I have a story.  I was at a Japanese restaurant just a few days ago (not eating dumplings).  At some point, behind me, I heard what sounded like a teen girl talking about what she planned to order: “I’m going to get the GOYZA!”  Goyza?  I was waiting for someone to correct her, at some point, as she repeated what she was getting, but apparently no one else… sigh.  And I think the waiter humored her by repeating the mispronounciation.  I was hoping someone, ANYONE, in that little restaurant would improve her life by pointing out that “gyoza” is not pronounced “goyza.”  Someone, anyone?  Someone, anyone but me?  Not me.  And not anyone else.

The message on the goyza postcard continues:

“I was put (in this envelope) Pochi-bukuro.  Pochi-bukuro (petit envelope) is often used in Japan.  Especially at New Year’s, there is a custom in Japan that adults give money to children as a tip.  Of course, it may be good for a small accessory or mini card.  Try using this Japanese style envelope in your creative style.

I don’t remember hearing about this Japanese tradition.  Now, I do know the envelopes, known as hongbao, for their use in the Chinese tradition during the Lunar New Year.  I have used hongbao in the past in “my creative style:” I gave a friend a coffee gift card in a little envelope.  He asked me where the money was.  I told him I wasn’t his parent.  A lot of Chinese adults still get hongbao from their parents.  Never having been a Chinese child, I have never received a cash-stuffed hongbao (at least, not that I remember).  I do have a little stash of little envelopes (they are sold at many places in my area, and have a variety of fun designs & famous characters), into which I stuff tiny treasures & junk when I am preparing a package to mail to a friend.

What do you think I should do with these Pochi-bukuro I have been sent?